John Harris

John Harris - Pebble Beach 1999, Detail -Oil on Canvas 18x28
John Harris - Monhegan Field, 2009 Oil on Canvas 34x20

John Harris – Monhegan Field, 2009 Oil on Canvas 34×20

John Harris - Parker Head 2 Oil on Canvas,  2014

John Harris – Parker Head 2 Oil on Canvas, 2014

John Harris - Pebble Beach 1999, Oil on Canvas 18x28

John Harris – Pebble Beach 1999, Oil on Canvas 18×28

John Harris - Spring Fields 2011, 6x20 Oil on Linen

John Harris – Spring Fields 2011, 6×20 Oil on Linen

John Harris - Small Landscape - Dimensions: 9x18

John Harris – Small Landscape – Dimensions: 9×18

John Harris - Maine water view - Dimensions: 9x18

John Harris – Maine water view – Dimensions: 9×18

John Harris - Maine lakeside scene - Dimensions: 7x20

John Harris – Maine lakeside scene – Dimensions: 7×20

John Harris: Field Scene - Dimensions: 6x20

John Harris: Field Scene – Dimensions: 6×20

John Harris - Water - Dimensions: 30x64

John Harris – Water – Dimensions: 30×64

John Harris - Water - Detail

John Harris – Water – Detail

John Harris - Pulpit Rock, 2009 Oil on Canvas 31x20

John Harris – Pulpit Rock, 2009 Oil on Canvas 31×20

John Harris - Parker Head, 2014 Oil on board 14x28

John Harris – Parker Head, 2014 Oil on board 14×28

John Harris - Black Head, 2014 Oil on Canvas 13x30

John Harris – Black Head, 2014 Oil on Canvas 13×30

John Harris - Bird Bath, 2009 Oil on Canvas 29x24

John Harris – Bird Bath, 2009 Oil on Canvas 29×24

John Harris - Fall Abstraction 2, 2015 Oil on Linen 26x22

John Harris – Fall Abstraction 2, 2015 Oil on Linen 26×22

John Harris - Fall Abstraction, 2015 Oil on Linen 24x20

John Harris – Fall Abstraction, 2015 Oil on Linen 24×20

Mr. Harris isolates and exaggerates forms, colors and sequences found in nature. His large scale, realist paintings take one to two months to complete, as he meticulously works to recreate various environmental complexities from photographs memory and artistic expression. The process begins with mapping out large shapes of color on canvas then details are added. When the paint dries more paint and glazes are added. The repetition of this careful glazing technique results in the dramatization of translucent layers – a visual effect that is conceptually harmonious with its subject: water.

Harris is most interested in exploring water’s physical properties – reflection, turbidity, rhythm, pattern, that make up its unique viewing experience. He addresses these issues by isolating a moment in time in various bodies of water, painting from a birds eye view. The result is a series of peaceful and hypnotic paintings, in which water is disguised as tree canopies and the skies above.